Tippytoes Childcare

Education institution number:
10359
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
45
Telephone:
Address:

60-62 Reelick Avenue, Pakuranga, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of Tippytoes Childcare

How well placed is Tippytoes Childcare to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Tippytoes Childcare is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Tippytoes Childcare is a well-established service in Pakuranga. It is licensed for 40 children, including a maximum of 20 under two years of age. Children learn in three separate age-group rooms.

There are 18 staff employed by the service, 10 of whom are registered teachers. The majority of staff are long serving. A manager oversees centre operations and administration. The recently appointed curriculum manager supports and mentors teachers with professional practice and documentation. She is supported by supervisors who oversee the daily programme in each room.

A whole-centre philosophy guides governance and management. Each room has a philosophy statement that distinguishes beliefs and practices for the three age groups. The aspirations of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, guide programmes.

Managers and staff have maintained the strengths and addressed areas for development identified in the 2014 ERO report.

The Review Findings

Teachers promote a curriculum that is strengths based. They value play as a way of learning and encourage children to lead their own learning. As a result, children are engaged and creative, and confidently try out new experiences. Managers' deliberate decision to have small numbers of children in each of the three rooms has contributed to the good quality learning experiences for children.

Children have a strong sense of belonging and know adults are there to support them. They engage in activities and projects for sustained periods. Children have access to good quality resources, and competently explore the environment to support and extend their play. One of the key features of the service is the flexible and adaptable programme that supports equitable opportunities for children with additional learning and developmental needs.

Māori children experience stories from their culture, and teachers use te reo Māori during programme. Māori symbols and art are evident in the environment. Teachers are using resources to help them increase their use of te reo Māori during group times. A group of teachers have taken the leadership role in strengthening bicultural practices. More consistently including te reo in spontaneous interactions and developing a long-term goal to reflect this centre-wide focus, are appropriate next steps.

There is good support for children's oral language development. Displays at children's level that show learning stories and depict centre events enable children to revisit and have conversations about their experiences. Children for whom English is an additional language can hear their heritage language spoken by teachers. This supports their cultural identity.

Children up to the age of three years have an individualised curriculum that is flexible and influenced by temperament, health, and routines. This is further supported by teachers with specialised knowledge and practice knowing children well and working in close partnership with whānau. Children have many opportunities for learning, and are secure in the knowledge that there is a familiar adult nearby.

Teachers are collaborative and collegial. They seek parents’ aspirations for their children’s learning during conversations, and this contributes to positive relationships with whānau. The online communication portal has also successfully strengthened communications, and enables teachers to share information about children's engagement in the programme. Leaders agree that documenting parents' aspirations would enhance children's learning records.

Teachers' professional development has helped them to strengthen learning support for children and partnerships with families. Improved practices have benefitted children from diverse cultures, and those with additional learning needs.

Managers are improvement focused and provide effective leadership. They work collaboratively with teachers to promote shared team approaches. A new staff appraisal process provides opportunities for teachers to reflect on and develop their practices. Managers now need to implement and embed this appraisal process.

Key Next Steps

Key next steps for managers and teachers include:

  • continuing to strengthen programme planning and evaluation

  • establishing specific goals for increasing the integration of bicultural practices

  • refining strategic goals and associated annual planning, to support ongoing improvements

  • implementing teacher appraisal processes that align with Teaching Council requirements.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Tippytoes Childcare completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services Northern

Northern Region

8 August 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Pakuranga, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10359

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

44

Gender composition

Boys 24 Girls 20

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
other European
other ethnic groups

5
28
5
6

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

May 2019

Date of this report

8 August 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

November 2014

Education Review

September 2011

Education Review

September 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Tippytoes Childcare

How well placed is Tippytoes Childcare to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Tippytoes Childcare is a privately owned centre in Pakuranga, East Auckland. It continues to provide high quality education and care for children up to school age.

The centre was established ten years ago. Since that time, its premises have been extended to include two neighbouring houses. These have been renovated to provide a homely environment that is well suited to children’s needs. The centre is licensed for 40 children, including a maximum of 20 under the age of two years. Its three separate spaces provide attractive and spacious areas for infants, toddlers and preschoolers.

The largest ethnic group of children attending the centre are New Zealand European. There is a much smaller numbers of Chinese and children from other cultures.

The centre employs 15 teachers and there is a high ratio of adults to children. Four teachers are currently undertaking training and seven are working towards full teacher registration. In the past year, management has implemented a new team structure. This helps to develop leadership and strengthen centre sustainability.

The owner/manager and assistant manager have made good progress in addressing the areas for development noted in the centre’s 2011 ERO report. They have also sustained the significant strengths acknowledged in that report.

The Review Findings

Children are valued and respected as individuals. They demonstrate a strong sense of belonging and wellbeing. This is promoted by the calm, settled environment established by staff. Children feel secure and content. They happily engage in play and conversation with each other and adults.

Children have ready access to a range of good quality resources and equipment. This encourages their creativity and curiosity. They have opportunities to explore a range of play areas, to follow their interests, and to experience challenge. Many children engage in sustained play and are able to develop their knowledge and skills.

Managers take an active role in teaching and modelling the high expectations they have of teachers. Together with staff, they demonstrate a strong commitment to the centre philosophy and to implementing effective teaching practices. As a result, children are involved in play that is appropriate for their age, developmental stage and goals.

High staffing ratios enable teachers to provide individualised programmes for infants and toddlers. Teachers communicate and work very well together as a team. They are responsive to the particular needs of infants and toddlers. Infants experience caring and nurturing interactions with staff and show trust in their teachers. Toddlers have many opportunities to develop language and skills at their own individual pace.

Teachers engage children in meaningful conversations that lead to real learning experiences. Early literacy, science and some mathematics learning is integrated through spontaneous play and project work. Children are becoming increasingly confident about asking questions and solving problems.

The curriculum promotes success for Māori and Pacific children. Teachers have improved their use of te reo Māori. They respond to whānau aspirations for their children. Aspects of te reo and te ao Māori are integrated into the environment and programme. Centre managers agree that they should continue to strengthen their bicultural practices to further support success for Māori children.

Staff also share their first language strengths to help children who speak Mandarin. This helps children to feel at home in the centre and contribute to strengthening relationships with their families. Teachers include a range of cultural experiences and languages in the programme.

Teachers provide an inclusive learning environment that supports positive outcomes for all children. They work alongside external agencies and families, taking a shared approach to supporting children with special needs. The progress these children make in achieving their goals is regularly monitored and shared with their families.

Teachers are continually growing their curriculum knowledge. They do this through shared discussion and professional learning and development. Teachers take time to observe children, to know them well and follow the directions they take in leading their own learning.

Planning and assessment records are very well documented to support the centre’s emergent curriculum approach. Learning stories successfully highlight children’s voices and detail children’s learning and development. Managers have recently implemented online portfolios. This is helping to foster more transparent communication and shared input from families. Teachers are continuing to develop their reflective practice to provide improved outcomes for children. Managers are committed to strengthening curriculum evaluation to further promote and support learning.

Centre managers provide very effective leadership and strategic direction. They are fostering an environment where children learn and develop to the best of their ability. Staff benefit from managers' collaborative leadership style. The staffing structure has been reviewed to distribute leadership among staff and to strengthen the centre sustainability. There is very good support for teachers through mentoring, team sharing, professional development and appraisal. Managers have appropriately reviewed the appraisal process to ensure that it is well linked to the registered teacher criteria.

Managers have an ongoing focus on supporting children to be capable and confident learners. They have a comprehensive understanding of systematic self-review for continual improvement. The centre is very well placed to continue to provide a high quality service for children and their families.

Key Next Steps

Managers agree that self-review could continue to be strengthened by:

  • increasingly including teacher and parent perspectives in the review process
  • refining and improving the review documentation processes, including evaluations of the impact of the curriculum on children’s learning.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Tippytoes Childcare completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Tippytoes Childcare will be in four years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

26 November 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Pakuranga, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10359

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

53

Gender composition

Boys 28 Girls 25

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Chinese

African

Indian

Samoan

other European

other Asian

4

32

7

2

2

2

3

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

October 2014

Date of this report

26 November 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

September 2011

 

Education Review

September 2008

 

Education Review

August 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.