Kaiwaka School

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Education institution number:
1027
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
141
Telephone:
Address:

33 Kaiwaka-Mangawhai Road, Kaiwaka

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Summary

Kaiwaka School is located in the Kaipara district of Northland and currently caters for 127 children from Years 1 to 6. Māori children make up 45 percent of the school roll. Small numbers of Pacific and other ethnic groups also attend the school.

Since ERO’s 2014 evaluation, new members have joined more experienced trustees on the board. A new deputy principal was appointed in 2016, and the principal was recently chosen to lead the Twin Coast Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL). This provides opportunities for new leadership experiences within the CoL and the school.

Over the last three years the school has sustained good levels of children’s achievement in relation to the National Standards. Valued outcomes for children are targeted through the school’s strategic planning, professional development for teachers, and the involvement of parents in their children’s learning.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

This school is improving its response to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The most effective aspect of the school in supporting equity and excellence is its culture which is underpinned by shared values. Leaders’ and teachers’ knowledge of learners, their whānau and the communitycontributes to responsive and positive learning relationships that support children in their learning. Professional learning is building the capability of the board, leaders and teachers and is contributing to school improvements.

A more explicit planning and professional development focus on children whose learning needs acceleration and on improving boys’ literacy would help to address in-school disparity. This focus would also help to lift overall achievement.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

This school is improving its response to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The learning and achievement of many children is being accelerated through classroom programmes and an increased range of interventions. The leadership team continues to focus on developing high quality teaching practices that support children who are at risk of not achieving the National Standards.

About 75 percent of children achieve the mathematics and reading standards, while achievement in writing is slightly lower. There is significant achievement disparity for boys, and a small disparity for Māori in writing. The school has strengthened the reliability of its processes for making teacher judgements about children’s achievement. This more robust approach is reflected in literacy achievement levels.

The Accelerated Learning in Literacy (ALL) programme helps leaders and teachers to inquire into the effectiveness of their practice. They work together to build their expertise in teaching writing. This intervention supports the learning needs of children who are at risk of not achieving.

Teachers provide learning activities that actively engage children. There is a deliberate focus on children whose learning needs to be accelerated. Thoughtful consideration is given to adapting the programme to meet the needs of groups and individuals. There is good support for children with additional learning needs.

The school’s curriculum strongly emphasises social skills and values. Children achieve well in these areas. They also develop positive attitudes and confidence in their own cultural heritage and the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The most effective aspect of the school in supporting equity and excellence is its culture that supports learners. Whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, mahi tahi, and ako are a significant part of this culture. The school’s SHARE values (share, helpful, aroha, respect, encouragement) are well known and promote an inclusive learning environment for children.

A well-established feature of the curriculum is the emphasis on promoting children’s cultural identity. Some children and teachers learn and use te reo Māori. A Māori language specialist provides in-depth programmes for children in te reo Māori me ōna tikanga and local Māori history. This programme helps teachers to continue to strengthen their bicultural practices and supports children’s learning.

Māori leadership is promoted and valued through pōwhiri, karakia, mihi, and waiata. Children and staff demonstrate pride in the symbolic importance of maunga Pukekaroro. The maunga and other significant landscape features are proudly recognised in the school’s pepeha and in the school’s waiata.

Leaders and teachers are building trusting relationships with whānau, parents and the community to support children’s learning. Teachers are proactive in contacting parents and whānau about their children’s learning and wellbeing. Children, parents and whānau feel supported through the development of effective learning-centred partnerships with the school. Whānau are involved in the ‘reading together’ programme, which supports learning at home. Children’s achievements are celebrated.

Focused professional learning for teachers is aligned with school goals for student achievement and helps to build leadership capability. Staff meetings involve professional discussions that focus on achievement. There is further potential for professional development through the CoL interactions and networks.

The board has a positive, collective agreement about what is valued in children’s education. Trustees participate in training to help them meet their responsibilities. Developing their ability to scrutinise data and to set meaningful targets and improvement goals is a priority. The board has a commitment to CoL membership and has actively participated in its formation. Trustees see it as an opportunity to help them improve outcomes for children in this school.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school has made progress towards improving writing achievement for Māori children and others. However, a clear focus is required on improving boys’ literacy. An improvement focus would include:

  • focusing the school’s charter targets more explicitly on children whose learning needs acceleration
  • continuing to develop learning partnerships with parents, whānau and the CoL
  • professional inquiry into strategies for improving boys’ literacy and lifting overall student achievement

Other developments to enable all children to learn about the bicultural foundations of Aotearoa New Zealand should include:

  • ensuring the curriculum document reflects and guides culturally responsive practices
  • strengthening teacher capability in te reo and tikanga Māori.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should review personnel policies to ensure they reflect current legal requirements.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated
  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners
  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

11 October 2017

About the school

Location

Kaiwaka, Northland

Ministry of Education profile number

1027

School type

Contributing

School roll

127

Gender composition

Boys 52% Girls 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Pacific
other European
other

45%
39%
7%
5%
4%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

July 2017

Date of this report

11 October 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

January 2015
December 2011
October 2008

Findings

Kaiwaka School is well led, managed and governed. A positive and inclusive school tone supports student learning and promotes high levels of achievement. Māori students benefit from the school’s determination that they experience educational success as Māori. A sense of community and growing collaboration permeate the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Kaiwaka School, established in 1870, is a rural school that provides good quality education for its students in Years 1 to 6. The school roll has increased significantly in 2013. Half of the students are of Māori heritage. Approximately a quarter of students at the school have been identified as having special educational needs.

The school’s respectful and inclusive tone supports the learning of all students. Students experience a strong sense of community and belonging. Their learning and wellbeing are prioritised. The school’s vision is to develop capable learners who show tolerance, empathy and understanding of others. The SHARE values (share, helpful, aroha, respect, encouragement) are well known and enacted. Māori protocols and tikanga are embraced in welcoming visitors to the school.

Students enjoy the use of the spacious grounds and good facilities. Ongoing refurbishments are enhancing their learning environment.

The previous principal retired at the end of 2012 after serving the school for many years. The strong emphasis on student learning: engagement, progress and achievement has been continued with the new principal. Appropriate professional development and initiatives, such as Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L), Incredible Years for Teachers and Accelerating Literacy Learning (ALL), are impacting positively on student wellbeing and achievement.

The school fulfils a central and integral role in the community of Kaiwaka. The board of trustees reflects the community and is supportive of school directions. Trustees demonstrate their commitment to improving student outcomes and monitoring progress towards goals. They value and respond to the views of their community. Productive relationships are being established with the local high school.

The school is proud of its reporting history with ERO. The positive features of Kaiwaka School acknowledged in ERO’s 2011 report continue to be evident. The school has responded well to ERO’s recommendations for improvement, particularly regarding the effective use of student achievement information, and using effective strategies to raise Māori student achievement.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement information very well to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. School leaders and staff have built a strong foundation for student learning based on respect, inclusion and community engagement.

High levels of student interest and motivation are evident across all groups of students. They are actively consulted about matters that affect them in a way that is appropriate to their age and maturity. Students confidently engage with their teachers and each other during learning and play. PB4L has helped build a shared understanding of expected behaviours, enabling students and teachers to focus on learning.

Overall the school’s National Standards data show that students achieve very well in reading, writing and mathematics. The principal’s focus on evidence-driven practice, and progress and achievement for all students is very evident in outcomes for students. Students achieve better than national and regional averages, as well as schools of a similar type. Māori students generally achieve as well as non-Māori.

There is good evidence that students make more than the expected gains during the year, raising students’ achievement from below National Standards to achieving at expected levels. The school now aims to further raise Māori student achievement so that a larger proportion of these students achieve above National Standard expectations. Reports to the board are used to identify priorities and plan for improved student outcomes.

School leaders and teachers have worked hard to identify and use the most appropriate assessment tools for their context. Considerable work has been done to build consistency in teachers’ understanding and use of overall teacher judgements (OTJs) in National Standards. This is leading to a common language around assessment and achievement. Students and teachers are well supported by teacher aides.

Data are very well used to target students’ specific learning needs. Teachers consistently monitor students’ progress towards their goals and targets. They are using systems and strategies from carefully selected professional learning to make meaningful improvements to student learning. High levels of in-class support for students with additional learning needs contribute to the inclusive school tone. These students have individual learning plans that are carefully monitored in consultation with parents, and shared with teacher aides.

Reports provide parents with useful information about their child’s achievement in National Standards, as well as about their learning across the wider curriculum. Parents are given a range of opportunities to discuss the engagement, learning and progress of their children. School leaders are now keen to further investigate ways in which student reports could show children’s progress during the year.

Teachers have taken leadership roles to guide the implementation of strategies learnt through professional development over the past two years. They have used these initiatives to build their capacity to evaluate the impacts of programmes designed to bring about positive changes for learners.

The next step for ongoing improvement is to increase student knowledge and ownership of their learning to equip them with strategies to be independent, responsible learners.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum is very effective in promoting and supporting student learning.

The school’s vision, values and learning priorities are well aligned with the principles ofThe New Zealand Curriculum. The board ensures, through the principal, that there is clear alignment from the strategic plan, through the annual plan, to curriculum delivery and programme implementation.

Students are active contributors to curriculum content and design. The board and leaders have responded positively to students’ input into changes to the curriculum and environment. Teachers show good knowledge of their students when selecting the content and designing their teaching approach. The collaborative approach between teachers and teacher aides further enhances students’ learning experiences.

The school’s involvement in professional development initiatives is informing programmes and practice. Curriculum priorities focus on positive outcomes for all students, and especially for Māori and students with diverse learning needs. All students have the opportunity to acquire knowledge of te reo Māori me ona tikanga through the weekly Ngā Tūmanako programme. Through the Reading Together initiative, the school is also building links to support parents’ active involvement in their children’s learning.

Significant upgrades to digital technology are enabling teachers and students to use Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) as teaching and learning tools. Professional development is helping teachers to develop useful understanding and strategies for effective implementation of ICT.

Students benefit from the spacious outdoor environment that includes a school swimming pool and access to community sporting facilities. The board has continued its programme of refurbishment to make the school and its surrounds an inviting and interesting place for learning.

The principal has planned to review the curriculum in 2015. This review could include:

  • the extent to which bicultural perspectives are evident in teaching practices and learning areas, and are reflected in the environment so that Māori and all students develop a better understanding of Aotearoa New Zealand’s bicultural heritage
  • further developing teachers’ capacity to evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching practice across the curriculum and across syndicate levels
  • investigation into the effectiveness of the curriculum and initiatives.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Approximately 50 percent of children at Kaiwaka School identify as Māori. Most children identify and descend from the local iwi Ngāti Whatua and Ngāpuhi. The school has developed good relationships with local marae, kaumatua and Māori whānau who are supportive of their school.

Māori students thrive in the school’s learning environment that strongly supports educational success for Māori, as Māori. Māori students confidently take lead roles in school protocols and experience success in cultural festivals.

Effective target setting and teaching strategies have accelerated Māori student achievement. Achievement data show that Māori students are achieving as well as their peers in mathematics, writing and reading. Small fluctuations in student numbers make it difficult to make statements about trends and patterns. Overall, Māori students exceed national and regional comparisons.

The school has a very good Māori curriculum that is well led by one of its teachers in the school. The Nga Tūmanako learning programme is designed to deliver Te Reo Māori, tikanga, history and the performing arts, waiata a ringa, haka and other strands of the Māori curriculum. The programme strongly supports Māori language, culture and identity. Most Māori students and their peers have chosen to be part of this weekly programme.

The school continues to use Te Aho Arataki Marau mo te Ako i te Reo Māori – Kura Auraki and He Reo Kupu, He Reo Ora to guide teaching and learning in te reo Māori. School leaders are doing research into Māori pedagogy and the curriculum, from a Māori perspective, to enhance success for Māori as Māori in authentic and meaningful ways. Good use is beginning to be made of Ka Hikitia-Accelerating Success 2013 - 2017 and Tātaiako - Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners, both of which are Ministry of Education resources to improve outcomes for Māori students.

The next steps for ongoing improvement and enhancement include:

  • ensuring that educational success for Māori as Māori is a clearly identified aspect in the school’s strategic planning
  • gathering the thoughts and aspirations of parents of Māori students about how to make sure students experience success as Māori at the school – as identified in ERO’s 2011 report
  • making further use of whānau hui to develop partnerships in learning with parents that will benefit Māori students and develop greater whānau input into, and ownership of, the school curriculum
  • further developing self review to enable leaders to evaluate the impact and effectiveness of Ngā Tūmanako and other programmes aimed at raising Māori student achievement.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The school is well led, managed and governed. The principal has been successful in her considered approach to managing change over the past two years. There are numerous opportunities for staff to lead and take responsibility for initiatives and interventions. Leaders continue to refine the performance management system and are beginning to include the cultural competencies from Tātaiako - Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners. The board of trustees has worked diligently to develop its understanding of governance roles and responsibilities.

Further factors contributing to sustainability include the:

  • school’s focus on, and commitment to, improving outcomes for priority learners
  • emphasis on a collaborative, coordinated approach to educational developments within the school
  • focus on reflection and evidence-based decision making to improve learning for all students
  • board’s commitment to ongoing improvement to enhance student learning.

The next steps for ongoing improvement are to:

  • continue to develop whole-staff capacity in self review to evaluate their effectiveness as teachers and their impact on student learning
  • ensure that leaders who are responsible for initiatives work collaboratively with the principal, take responsibility for leading the evaluation of these initiatives, and meet agreed timelines
  • further develop trustees’ capability to review and evaluate the effectiveness of their roles and processes.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

The following areas of non-compliance were discussed with the board and school leadership team:

  • in consultation with the school's Māori community, develop and make known to the school's community policies, plans and targets for improving the achievement of Māori students [National Administration Guidelines 1e]
  • ensure that parents are not invoiced or charged for their children’s access to the curriculum, including levies for paper and use of computer facilities [Ministry of Education Circular 2013/06].

Conclusion

Kaiwaka School is well led, managed and governed. A positive and inclusive school tone supports student learning and promotes high levels of achievement. Māori students benefit from the school’s determination that they experience educational success as Māori. A sense of community and growing collaboration permeate the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer - Northern

Northern Region

16 January 2015

About the School

Location

Kaiwaka, Northland

Ministry of Education profile number

1027

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

98

Gender composition

Girls 51

Boys 47

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

African

Niue

European

Indian

49

43

2

2

1

1

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

16 January 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

December 2011

October 2008

August 2005