Learning Edge Montessori Preschool

Education institution number:
10220
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
15
Telephone:
Address:

2 Sunray Avenue, Titirangi, Auckland

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ERO’s Akanuku | Assurance Review reports provide information about whether a service meets and maintains regulatory standards. Further information about Akanuku | Assurance Reviews is included at the end of this report.

ERO’s Judgement

Regulatory standards

ERO’s judgement

Curriculum

Meeting

Premises and facilities

Meeting

Health and safety

Meeting

Governance, management and administration

Meeting

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows it has addressed non-compliances and is now taking reasonable steps to meet regulatory standards.

Background

Learning Edge Montessori Preschool is a privately owned and operated education and care service. The service provides sessional and full-day care and education for a maximum of 20 children aged between two and six years. The owner/manager is a qualified registered teacher. She leads a team of three staff including two qualified registered teachers.

Summary of Review Findings

Adults providing education and care engage in meaningful, positive interactions to enhance children’s learning. Children’s preferences are respected, and they are involved in decisions about their learning experiences. Positive steps are taken to respect and acknowledge the aspirations held by parents and whānau for their children.

The curriculum provided is inclusive and supports children to develop their social competency and understand appropriate behaviour. The curriculum is informed by assessment, planning, and evaluation. Teaching practice demonstrates an understanding of children’s learning, development and knowledge of relevant theories and practice in early childhood education.

Compliance

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows that it has addressed the following non-compliances:

  • Having systems to monitor that premises, furniture, furnishings, fittings, equipment, and materials are kept safe, hygienic, and maintained in good condition (HS1).
  • Documenting a procedure for changing nappies that shows all documented requirements including that all children are treated with dignity and respect (HS3).
  • Ensuring heavy furniture, fixtures, and equipment that could fall or topple and cause serious injury or damage are secured (HS6).
  • Displaying and implementing a procedure for monitoring children's sleep, including that children are checked for warmth, breathing, and general wellbeing at least every 5-10 minutes, or more frequently according to individual needs (HS9).
  • Checking equipment, premises, and facilities on each day of operation for hazards to children including all cleaning agents and hazards present in the kitchen (HS12).
  • Having a means to monitor that the temperature of warm water delivered from any taps that children can access independently is no higher than 40°C, and comfortable for children at the centre to use (HS13).
  • Ensuring water stored in any hot water cylinder is kept at a temperature of at least 60°C (HS14).
  • Ensuring that whenever children leave the premises on an excursion, parents have given prior written approval to their child's participation and of the proposed ratio for regular excursions at the time of enrolment; and special excursions prior to the excursion taking place (HS17).
  • Ensuring if children travel in a motor vehicle while in the care of the service each child is restrained as required by Land Transport legislation (HS18).
  • Having a record of the written authority from parents for the administration of medicine in accordance with the requirement for the category of medicine used, including evidence of parental acknowledgement (HS28).
  • Having evidence of training and/or information provided to adults who administer medicine to children (other than their own) while at the service (HS29).
  • Having a written child protection policy that meets all the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014 (HS31).
  • Monitoring that all indoor and outdoor items and surfaces, furniture, equipment, and materials are safe and suitable for their intended use (PF5).
  • Ensuring any windows or other areas of glass accessible to children are either made of safety glass; or covered by an adhesive film designed to hold the glass in place in the event of it being broken; or effectively guarded by barriers which prevent a child striking or falling against the glass (PF7).
  • Ensuring there are facilities for the hygienic preparation, storage and/or serving of food and drink that contain a means of keeping perishable food at a temperature at or below 4°C (PF16).
  • Having evidence that a tempering valve or other accurate means of limiting hot water temperature is installed (PF24).
  • Having a first aid kit that complies with licensing requirements (PF28).
  • Ensuring suitable human resource management practices are implemented, including selection and appointment procedures that meet the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014 (GMA7).
  • Ensuring all children’s workers who have access to children are safety checked in accordance with the Children’s Act 2014, including safety checking every three years. Safety checks must be carried out by the employer or another person or organisation acting on their behalf (GMA7A).

Next ERO Review

The next ERO review is likely to be an Akarangi | Quality Evaluation.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Northern)
Northern Region | Te Tai Raki

6 August 2021 

Information About the Service

Early Childhood Service Name

Learning Edge Montessori Preschool

Profile Number

10220

Location

Titirangi, Auckland

Service type

Education and care service

Number licensed for

20 children over the age of 2 years

Percentage of qualified teachers

80%+

Service roll

18

Ethnic composition

Māori 1, NZ European/Pākehā 5, other ethnic groups 12

Review team on site

May 2021

Date of this report

6 August 2021

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, July 2018
Education Review, May 2015

General Information about Assurance Reviews

All services are licensed under the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. The legal requirements for early childhood services also include the Licensing Criteria for Education and Care Services 2008.

Services must meet the standards in the regulations and the requirements of the licensing criteria to gain and maintain a licence to operate.

ERO undertakes an Akanuku | Assurance Review process in any centre-based service:

  • having its first ERO review – including if it is part of a governing organisation
  • previously identified as ‘not well placed’ or ‘requiring further development’
  • that has moved from a provisional to a full licence
  • that have been re-licenced due to a change of ownership
  • where an Akanuku | Assurance Review process is determined to be appropriate.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

All early childhood services are required to promote children’s health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. Before the review, the staff and management of a service completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO assesses whether the regulated standards are being met. In particular, ERO looks at a service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher certification; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO also gathers and records evidence through:

  • discussions with those involved in the service
  • consideration of relevant documentation, including the implementation of health and safety systems
  • observations of the environment/premises, curriculum implementation and teaching practice.

1 Evaluation of Learning Edge Montessori Preschool

How well placed is Learning Edge Montessori Preschool to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Learning Edge Montessori Preschool is a small, established service in the West Auckland suburb of Titirangi. The service provides sessional and full-day care and education for a maximum of 20 children aged between 2 and 6 years.

The service's experienced, qualified teachers are Montessori-trained and they have a strong Montessori approach. The centre's philosophy is linked to Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, and notes that teachers will work collaboratively to support each child's unique development. It promotes building children's independence, confidence and life-skills in meaningful contexts. Parent involvement in events and activities is promoted to enhance outcomes for children.

ERO's 2015 report identified a variety of good practices. It also noted next steps for ongoing improvement. These included promoting children's thinking and complex play, using internal evaluation to guide improvement and strengthening bicultural practices.

The Review Findings

The teaching team fosters a deep sense of respect and care. Children reflect these priorities in their relationships and the way they interact. They work well together, with a great deal of conversation, negotiation, support and kindness shown to peers. Older children are thoughtful and caring about their younger peers' wellbeing. Relationships at all levels are positive and caring with a strong sense of belonging and wellbeing.

Teachers work as facilitators as children explore various activities. They promote children's learning through hands-on exploration. Children have good access to indoor and outdoor areas and engage in focused play. Teachers extend and challenge children's thinking. They give children space and time to work at their own pace. The team is responsive to emerging questions and discoveries. Children's interests are nurtured with additional topics, celebrations and outings.

The environment is ordered and well cared for. Teachers make good use of routines and modelling to foster appropriate behaviours. Teachers prompt and acknowledge children's developing independence in problem solving and decision making. Children revisit prior learning experiences and materials to reinforce their knowledge and mastery of skills, strongly reflecting a Montessori approach.

Children's portfolios of learning inform the daily programme. They are regularly shared with families who are invited to give feedback on the programme. Parents meet with teachers to discuss their children's progress in formal and informal ways. This is promoting learning partnerships between teachers and parents. The centre shares good information about the philosophy and teaching to inform the community about the Montessori programme.

The centre is well led. There is a collaborative approach to goal setting, planning and review. Key priorities are defined in strategic and annual planning. Goals are worked upon in a coordinated way and align with the centre's vision and philosophy. Good systems are in place to promote safety and wellbeing.

The head teacher has strengthened performance management systems since the 2015 ERO review. There is a strong focus on review and improvement. Targeted professional development has enhanced mentoring. The head teacher fosters professional connections with other services, as well as with schools. Teachers' attendance at annual Montessori conferences strengthens their professional practice networks.

Key Next Steps

The head teacher's intention to revisit annual planning to define fewer goals, with more specific and deliberate actions, is appropriate. Other key areas that should be prioritised include:

  • reviewing programmes and bicultural practices in relation to Te Tiriti o Waitangi

  • reviewing the philosophy, curriculum, planning and assessment in relation to the principles and strands of Te Whāriki 2017

  • promoting teachers' evaluation of their practice in relation to the service's quality indicators

  • considering ways to promote greater parent and child contribution to assessment portfolios

  • streamlining the documentation of policies and procedures.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Learning Edge Montessori Preschool completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Learning Edge Montessori Preschool will be in three years.

Julie Foley

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

30 July 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Titirangi, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10220

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

20 children over the age of 2 years

Service roll

31

Gender composition

Girls 19 Boys 12

Ethnic composition

Pākehā
other

17
14

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2018

Date of this report

30 July 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

February 2015

Education Review

February 2012

Supplementary Review

November 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.