All about children - Avondale

Education institution number:
10189
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
44
Telephone:
Address:

2 Sandy Lane, Avondale, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of All about children - Avondale

How well placed is All about children - Avondale to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

All about children - Avondale operates in a refurbished building in a residential area. It offers all day care and education and is licensed for up 50 children including up to 16 under 2 years of age. Three separate rooms cater for infants, toddlers and preschool children.

The centre is one of six services owned by the same family business. An operations manager, a development manager and the directors/owners work together to develop and monitor the strategic direction. A centre manager works closely with the operations manager to achieve the centre's strategic vision and philosophy. Values of trust, respect and relationships, along with the strands of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, underpin programmes for children. A commitment to te Tiriti o Waitangi is evident in practice.

ERO's 2015 review identified significant areas for improvement. Since the appointment of a permanent centre manager, the staff have focused on addressing these areas. Professional development has contributed to an improvement in teachers' planning, assessment and evaluation practices. Changes to the indoor and outdoor environments have improved how the programme can foster positive outcomes for children.

The Review Findings

Children settle quickly and are happy to play with their friends. They choose where to play and confidently choose the equipment they need. They respond to adults positively and some share their ideas openly with teachers. Their confidence to manage themselves is evident, and respect for each other is demonstrated during mealtimes and other centre rituals. Teachers encourage tuakana/teina relationships, and children demonstrate a welcoming attitude to others.

Attractive and well considered environments reflect a very positive response to ERO's 2015 report. They cater appropriately for the different ages. Open-ended resources inspire children to use their imagination and creativity in their play.

Teachers engage positively and warmly with children. They know children's families and are caring and welcoming. Teachers provide a variety of group experiences for children, and some are able to use children's home languages in conversations. It is timely for teachers to focus on developing children's individual interests and promoting more complex play.

Changes to the curriculum reflect teachers' learning and the impact of relevant professional development. Teachers have applied their knowledge to review and improve their planning, assessment and evaluation of programmes for children. Portfolios record children's ongoing learning. They are available online and in hard copies. Parents are invited to comment, and to help teachers plan for children's interests. Making children's learning more visible in records, will help to strengthen learning partnerships with parents, and support how teachers promote positive outcomes for children

A clearly documented strategic plan guides the centre's vision. The centre manager and operations manager work closely to monitor centre goals. The centre manager leads the team of teachers to manage the enactment of the philosophy. Internal evaluation helps teachers and leaders to make relevant ongoing changes.

The appraisal process is currently being updated to meet Education Council requirements. Professional learning is meaningful, and could be aligned to support the strategic intentions and strengthen appraisal goals. There are clear processes to ensure good health and safety procedures are in place.

Key Next Steps

Owners and managers agree that key next steps for centre development include:

  • developing partnerships with whānau and parents in planning, assessment, and evaluation to strengthen provision for children
  • increasing the rigour of internal evaluation for ongoing improvement
  • embedding effective teaching practices and promoting complexity in children's learning.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of All about children - Avondale completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist.  In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of All about children - Avondale will be in three years.

Julie Foley
Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

7 May 2018 

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Avondale, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10189

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 16 aged under 2

Service roll

51

Gender composition

Boys 36, Girls 15

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Indian
Samoan
Tongan
African
Chinese
other Pacific peoples
other 

  5
  7
13
  6
  3
  3
  3
  3
  8

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49%       50-79%       80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

January 2018

Date of this report

7 May 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

October 2015

Education Review

June 2012

Education Review

May 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau. 

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Kids World Childcare Limited

How well placed is Kids World Childcare Limited to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Teachers promote children’s wellbeing and belonging but are not yet providing programmes, or environments that consistently foster children’s learning. While they have made progress, the new owner and centre manager acknowledge that further improvements are needed.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Kids World Childcare Limited provides full day care and education for up to 50 children including a small group under two years old. The centre operates in purpose-built premises with separate playrooms for three age-related groups. The two older groups share an outdoor playground.

In early 2015 the centre changed ownership. In June 2015 the new owner appointed a new centre manager to guide staff and bring about the changes necessary to achieve positive learning outcomes for children. The manager has begun this process by building relationships with families and reviewing the centre philosophy in consultation with teachers.

The centre has seven registered teachers, including the manager. Some of the teaching team reflect the cultural diversity of the community. Many children benefit from having teachers who can speak their home languages. The owner frequently visits the centre and expresses a willingness to upgrade the environment and support the teachers’ ongoing professional development.

In 2012 ERO reported many positive aspects of the service but also noted the need for teachers to improve planning and more effectively respond to children's interests. ERO was also concerned about the quality of the outdoor environment for babies. While the new owner and centre manager have begun several improvements, these two areas must now be priorities for action.

The Review Findings

Most children are well settled and show a sense of belonging in the centre. They share positive relationships with teachers and friendships with their peers. The older children enjoy opportunities to independently access the outdoor area and engage in social play. Children participate well in small group activities, including singing and stories on the mat. They would now benefit from better access to quality resources that would challenge their thinking and stimulate complex play.

Teachers are committed to children's care and wellbeing. They encourage children to become involved in activities and engage them in friendly conversations about their play. Teachers’ understanding of children's languages and cultures provides reassurance for parents that their children's personal needs will be met. The challenge now is for teachers to shift their focus from programme routines to extending children’s individual interests with exciting learning experiences.

Teachers identify broad developmental areas or topical events to guide programmes. They plan resources and activities to support children’s general areas of interest. Teachers also incorporate cultural celebrations and include some te reo Māori in their programmes. Attractive portfolios document children's participation in the centre and encourage parents to become active partners in their child's learning. Teachers acknowledge the need to improve the quality of curriculum management practices.

The manager has taken prompt action to improve indoor learning environments. Displays have been refreshed, learning areas better defined, and children's access to resources improved. This work should continue, particularly to give the older children more independent access to a wider range of resources. The owner could seek external expertise to help him with planned development of the outdoor environment, especially for infants and toddlers.

The owner and manager have made good progress in establishing management and personnel systems. They have developed strategic and annual plans and strengthened the centre’s policy framework. The manager has engaged teachers in self-review processes that are beginning to have a positive impact on practices. The first stage of an appraisal process for teachers has been implemented and teachers are meeting regularly to discuss strategies for improvement. The owner now needs to provide leadership support for the centre manager to ensure her workload does not become too onerous.

Key Next Steps

The owner and centre manager agree the priorities for centre development should include:

  • refining the strategic plan to more clearly prioritise key areas for development
  • increasing the quality and accessibility of resources to enhance children's learning
  • providing professional development to improve teachers’ planning, assessment and evaluation practices
  • coaching and modelling teaching approaches that reflect best practice in early childhood education
  • a staged upgrade of the outdoor environments.

The owner recognises that external advice is needed to support the manager and teachers to make the required improvements.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Kids World Childcare Limited completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

In order to improve practices the owner should ensure that the amenities in the staffroom are suitable and hygienic.

Actions for compliance

ERO identified areas of non-compliance relating to the environment. To meet health and safety requirements the service needs to provide a suitable and safe outdoor environment for children under two years old.

Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, PF14.

Development Plan Recommendation

ERO recommends that the service consult with the Ministry of Education and plan to address the key next steps and actions outlined in this report.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Kids World Childcare Limited will be within two years.

Graham Randell
Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Avondale, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10189

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 12 aged under 2

Service roll

38

Gender composition

Boys 20
Girls 18

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Indian
Ethiopian
Samoan
Chinese
Tongan
others

2
4
11
7
7
3

2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2015

Date of this report

22 October 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

June 2012

Education Review

May 2009

Supplementary Review

July 2006

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.