Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa

Education institution number:
10101
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Tongan ECE service
Total roll:
21
Telephone:
Address:

148 Coronation Road, Mangere Bridge, Auckland

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Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa - 07/09/2018

1 Evaluation of Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa

How well placed is  Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa is a Tongan language early childhood centre in Mangere Bridge, Auckland. The akoteu philosophy promotes Tongan language and culture alongside Christianity and Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. The centre is licensed for up to 36 children, including a maximum of four up to two years of age.

The centre is governed by the Tokaikolo Education Trust Board (TETB) and managed by the Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa management committee. Since the 2017 ERO review, a new centre manager has been appointed. A supervisor has responsibility for professional leadership in the service and reports to the management committee.

Since ERO's 2017 review, the board and management committee have made good progress in addressing the areas of concern identified by ERO. Curriculum professional support is reflected well in improved teaching and learning. Health and safety practices have been established.

The Review Findings

Children enter the akoteu confidently, display a strong sense of belonging, and choose and become highly engaged in activities. They are relaxed and secure in the akoteu and enjoy caring relationships with other children and teachers. Children also display good social skills and respect for each other as they interact, explore and engage in periods of sustained play.

Children benefit from supportive and nurturing caregiving. Teachers recognise the communication styles of individual children and respond appropriately to their needs. They encourage children's independence and support them to make choices. Teachers provide good quality care for infants and toddlers, and at times these younger children play alongside older children.

Tongan language and culture are strongly evident in the learning environment and in teaching practices. Teachers' cultural backgrounds reflect those of the children attending. Teachers value and support children's home languages. Centre leaders and teachers have a good level of commitment to increasing the extent to which te ao Māori is visible in the programme.

The curriculum offers children opportunities for learning and exploration through play. The results of children's learning are evident in the environment. Mat time routines gives children opportunities for movement and song and to speak to the group. Te reo Māori, Tongan, waiata, dance and karakia are woven through mat time, reflecting the philosophy and culture of the centre.

Children have good access to outdoor areas. A large sandpit, bikes and a climbing frame are enjoyed by children in the outside area. Teachers could now increase resourcing of the outdoor area to further support the development of children's complex play and learning.

Teachers identify children's interests and set learning objectives for them based on their observations. Observation and recording of children's developing interests provide good information for teachers' planning, assessment and development of next steps for learning.

A transition programme is in place to support children starting school. A review of this programme could help strengthen relationships with local schools. Stronger pathways between the centre and school would benefit children starting school.

Programme planning is linked to Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. Teachers respond to children's individual interests in their planning. Children's portfolios contain a mix of individual and group learning stories and are beginning to show the development of individual children's learning.

A teacher appraisal process, linked to the Education Council requirements, has been established. The new centre leader, supported by the board, is working to develop a culture of quality teaching practice. Teachers should now strengthen internal evaluation. This could help to ensure evaluative processes provide teachers with further insight into their practice, and contribute to positive outcomes for children's learning.

Key Next Steps

In order to improve practice and promote positive outcomes for children, the board and leaders need to:

  • build internal evaluation across all centre operations

  • ensure ongoing professional learning in leadership and effective teaching is available for all leaders and teachers

  • prioritise governance training for the board

  • prioritise funding in the akoteu's budget to develop resources that promote choice and challenge in children's learning.

  • prioritise professional learning funding in the akoteu's budget to enable teachers to fulfil Education Council requirements.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa will be in three years.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Director Review and Improvement Services

Te Tai Raki - Northern Region

7 September 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Mangere Bridge, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10101

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

36 children, including up to 4 aged under 2 years

Service roll

35

Gender composition

Boys 18 Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Tongan

other Ethnic Groups

29

6

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

July 2018

Date of this report

7 September 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Supplementary Review

May 2017

Supplementary Review

March 2015

Education Review

February 2011

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa - 25/05/2017

1 Evaluation of Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa

How well placed is Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa is a Tongan language early childhood centre, located in Mangere Bridge, Auckland, on the site of the Tokaikolo Christian Church. The centre's philosophy promotes the teaching of Tongan language and culture alongside Christianity within the context of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. Teachers value Tongan language, culture and identity, which are strongly evident in the environment and in teaching practices. The centre is licensed for up to 36 children, including a maximum of four up to two years of age

The centre is governed by the Tokaikolo Education Trust Board (TETB) and managed by the Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa management committee. The centre supervisor has responsibility for the professional leadership of the centre's four qualified teachers, three teacher aides, the curriculum and daily centre operations. The supervisor reports to the management committee, which is supported by a full-time administrator.

The Review Findings

Since ERO's 2015 review the board and management committee have made some good progress by restructuring centre governance and management. Ministry of Education curriculum support is not yet well reflected in the programmes for children. Ongoing external professional support is essential to help teachers lift the quality of teaching and learning.

Although the management committee has improved systems and accountability, there are still concerns relating to health and safety practices. Issues identified at the time of the 2015 ERO review have not been sufficiently progressed. External support with this matter is critical to the wellbeing of children and adults in the centre.

Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa managers and staff need support to develop and implement health and safety policies and procedures that meet legal requirements. Areas that require immediate attention are:

  • referencing in appropriate policies to the Vulnerable Children Act 2014 and ensuring these are practised
  • ensuring that police vetting of all adults in the centre who are not registered teachers is completed in a timely manner

To ensure that the centre environment is a safe place for children and adults, managers must also:

  • ensure that accident, sickness, hazard, attendance and food safety registers are used and monitored as required
  • ensure staff closely monitor the use of child-safe locks to secure exterior exits to public areas and interior doors to areas containing hazards
  • be fully aware of Ministry of Education requirements and undertake robust risk analysis and management for trips including the use of other classroom spaces outside the licensed centre premises.

In response to ERO's 2015 report, teachers have attended professional development with an external facilitator. While the impact of this support is evident in teachers' appraisal journals, day-to-day teacher practice does not yet reflect a good understanding of this learning. There continues to be significant inconsistencies between documented expectations, guidelines for teaching and learning and the programme provided for children.

Teachers have participated in professional development to gain understanding of the new requirements of the Education Council. As a result, some good progress is evident in teacher appraisal. A next step is for teachers to engage with the evaluative requirements of the appraisal process.

Managers and teachers need to develop and implement a robust process of internal evaluation so that their review and update of centre policies and procedures is always in line with good practice and legal requirements. This would help the management committee and board to be assured that centre operations are being guided by relevant policy frameworks.

The supervisor requires significant ongoing support to ensure that improved teaching, systems, policies and procedures are well understood by teachers and actioned in the daily running of the centre.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children’s health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements

Actions for compliance

ERO found significant areas of non-compliance in the service related to:

  • provision for the health and safety of children and adults in the centre

  • internal evaluation

  • risk analysis and management for excursions

  • leadership of teaching and learning

  • personnel, employment and child protection policies and procedures relating to the Vulnerable Children Act 2014

  • use of unlicensed premises.

Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, HS4, 6, 8, 12, 17, 20, 27, 28, 29, 31; GMA 6, 7, 7A, 11; 43; PF1, 3, 4, 8

Recommendation to Ministry of Education

ERO recommends that the Ministry reassess the licence of Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa. ERO will not undertake a further education review of this service until the Ministry of Education is satisfied that the service meets licensing requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Akoteu Faka-Kalisitiane Ko Namoa will be in consultation with the Ministry of Education.

Steffan Brough

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

25 May 2017 

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Mangere Bridge, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10101

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

36 children, including up to 4 aged under 2

Service roll

33

Gender composition

Girls 21, Boys 12

Ethnic composition

Māori
Tongan
Cook Island Māori

4
27
2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

50-79%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

March 2017

Date of this report

25 May 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Supplementary Review

March 2015

Education Review

February 2011

Supplementary Review

October 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.