Next Generation Infant Care

Education institution number:
10058
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
15
Telephone:
Address:

12 Westglade Crescent, Birkenhead, Auckland

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Next Generation Infant Care - 03/03/2020

1 Evaluation of Next Generation Infant Care

How well placed is Next Generation Infant Care to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Next Generation Infant Care is very well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

Background

Next Generation Infant Care is licensed to provide full-day education and care for up to 20 children aged under two years. Children access two indoor learning spaces, including a quieter play area for very young children. The centre serves a culturally diverse community.

The centre is one of four under the ownership of Next Generation Childcare Company Limited. An experienced management team, including a director of the company, oversee the day-to-day running of the centre. They lead a team of three qualified teachers and one teacher in training.

The teaching philosophy focuses on the provision of an empowering environment respectful of the aspirations and values of whānau. Teachers aim to support children to become critical thinkers, to value their own and other cultures, and to have control over their learning. Establishing a sense of community with whānau, children and teachers is a central focus of the team.

The 2016 ERO report noted many aspects of quality teaching and learning practices that have been sustained. Areas for development included communication with families, bicultural practice and access to ongoing professional learning and development. There has been very good progress in these areas.

The centre is a member of the Te Ara Whetu Kāhui Ako | Community of Learning.

The Review Findings

The centre's philosophy is evident in the programme and teaching practices. Children confidently explore their environment and easily access resources that engage them in play and learning. They play alongside each other and respond with kindness to those around them. Children are relaxed and settled.

Children benefit from having consistency in teaching teams and teachers who provide nurturing, individualised care. Teachers know and understand the communication styles of individual children and skilfully use language to engage them in play and to model interactions with others. Children have developed secure attachments to their caregivers.

Teachers provide a calm, uncluttered environment and actively support children to explore indoors and outdoors. The spacious, natural outdoor play space provides a good range of physical challenges. Teachers support children's choices, include children in decisions that affect them and work well as a team. Children confidently investigate their surroundings, following their interests and curiosities.

Teachers and leaders have implemented numerous communication strategies with families. Time is allocated to welcome new families into the centre through meetings with a leader or teacher. Parents contribute to a blog where they can provide feedback regarding the programme and discuss their children's learning. Teachers gather whānau aspirations and reference these in learning stories supporting learning-based partnerships.

Leaders identify bicultural practice as a significant area of growth in this centre over the past 12 months. Effective professional learning and ongoing internal evaluation is supporting deeper knowledge and understandings of te reo Māori and Māori values and concepts. Teachers use te reo in their interactions with children and in learning stories. Increasing the visibility of te ao Māori in centre practices and documentation is an ongoing goal.

Leaders and teachers are continuing to develop and refine a new process of programme planning. As a result of professional learning, new templates have been introduced to simplify the process and to ensure a meaningful programme is planned for each child within the group setting. Teachers record children's learning through well-written learning stories. Portfolios show continuity and developing complexity of children's learning.

Service leaders have established a culture of continuous improvement. They have implemented a robust process for internal evaluation and successfully engage the whole team in focused professional learning opportunities. This ensures shared understandings across the team and supports the successful implementation of new initiatives that lead to positive outcomes for children. The leadership structure supports all teachers to lead in their area of strength. The service is well managed and led.

Key Next Steps

To enhance their current high-quality provision for children, centre leaders agree that their key next steps include rationalising and clarifying the centre's strategic goals to establish a clear direction for the future.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Next Generation Infant Care completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services (Northern)

Northern Region - Te Tai Raki

3 March 2020

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Birkenhead, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10058

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

20 children aged under 2 years

Service roll

20

Gender composition

Girls 13

Boys 7

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Indian

other ethnic groups

2

8

4

6

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

January 2020

Date of this report

3 March 2020

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

June 2016

Education Review

June 2013

Education Review

March 2010

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Next Generation Infant Care - 17/06/2016

1 Evaluation of Next Generation Infant Care

How well placed is Next Generation Infant Care to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Next Generation Infant Care is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children. 

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Next Generation Infant Care in Birkenhead provides education and care for children up to two years of age. This is one of three centres in Birkenhead owned and operated by the owner. Children from this centre often transition into the centre for children from two to five years of age.

The centre is licensed for 20 children and is operated and managed by an experienced and long serving management team, including the owner. Children attend at varying times and, some, for a variety of days. The centre is led by a supervisor. A newly formed management leadership team visit regularly and provide advice and guidance.

The philosophy for the centre has recently been reviewed and updated. It clearly expresses teachers' intentions for their teaching and relationships with children and their families. The document also comments about their growing understanding and knowledge of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. Next Generation Infant Care has had a positive ERO reporting history.

The Review Findings

Next Generation Infant Care continues to provide good quality education and care for young children. Teachers greet children and their parents warmly on arrival. They share news with parents about their children, fostering the close partnerships that are evident. Children confidently transition from parents to teachers. The shared care philosophy teachers follow works successfully to ensure children are trusting with all the adults in the centre. Children are settled and playful in the care of teachers.

The centre provides two indoor playing spaces and a generous and interesting outdoor playground. An upstairs room is designated for the younger babies who are not yet mobile, while the older children play in a more spacious area downstairs which leads directly to the outdoors. The younger children frequently visit downstairs with their teachers. These provisions provide good opportunities for children to make choices about their play and to enjoy each other's company.

Children make choices about where they want to play, making very good use of the newly shaded deck. Teachers provide resources and activities that successfully encourage children's exploration and interest. Children challenge themselves on thoughtfully placed balancing and climbing equipment.

Children's routines are well managed. The flow of the day is responsive to their needs and, for the younger babies, based on their home routines. Teachers place value on parent's aspirations for their children by striving to give them a sense of belonging and wellbeing. Teachers take the opportunity during hygiene processes to talk and sing to children, making these special one-to-one times. All of the children are responsive and cooperative, and indicate their affection for teachers.

The majority of the children are Pākehā, with small numbers from other cultures, including Māori. Teachers are aware of the need for their curriculum to reflect the bicultural heritage of New Zealand and do this well. They include words and phrases in te reo Māori in their conversations with children and sing waiata with and to them. The centre resources and decorations also indicate teachers' intentions to reflect both Māori and Pacifica cultures. Teachers use some words in children's home languages for those who are learning English as an additional language.

Teachers' assessment and planning processes are well established and provide effectively for children's development. They place a strong focus on children's dispositions as a guide for planning that helps to foster physical, emotional and social skills and abilities. Teachers provide a wide and varied curriculum. Evaluation of programmes is regular.

A particular focus in the programme is on talking to children. Teachers recognise that children need to hear a wide variety of spoken language in order to build vocabulary and confidence as communicators. Teachers are using Baby Sign language with children to help them to communicate.

Parents are informed regularly about their children's progress through learning stories in attractive and informative portfolios and on-line reporting. Teachers depend on daily face-to-face communication to give them greater awareness of children's health and happiness each day.

Teachers' teaching has undergone a significant, positive change towards reflective examination of the impact of their work on their own learning and on children's positive learning outcomes. New appraisal processes have generated this change and encouraged teachers to continue professional and open to learning. The increased focus on evidential files to meet the practicing teacher accreditation has also had an impact. Self-review processes are well established and add a further dimension to teachers' knowledge about the effectiveness of programmes.

Management of the centre, including personnel management, is well organised and efficient. Leadership is thoughtfully shared to take advantage of teachers' professional knowledge, skills and interests. Capacity building is becoming a strength of the service.

External professional development, including the leadership team as well as teachers, is creating a team culture of shared responsibility. The new appraisal processes, instigated last year, have a focus on professional practice and the identification of appropriate professional learning and development to further strengthen teachers' work with children.

Key Next Steps

Centre management identified and ERO supports the following key next steps for the centre. These are to continue to:

  • effectively use the centre's ongoing self review process to strengthen communication ties to families, children and their team,

  • strengthen the bicultural focus on using te reo Māori and implementing appropriate protocols

access professional learning and development that will enable teachers to stay current with good practices that have a positive impact on children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Next Generation Infant Care completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Next Generation Infant Care will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

17 June 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Birkenhead, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

10058

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

20 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

24

Gender composition

Boys 12

Girls 12

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

other

2

20

2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

May 2016

Date of this report

17 June 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

June 2013

Education Review

March 2010

Education Review

April 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.